Posts Tagged ‘NFL’

R.I.P. #55

May 3, 2012

Tragedy struck the city of San Diego yesterday morning when NFL legend and future hall of famer Junior Seau apparently took his own life. According to police Seau shot himself in the chest at his Oceanside residence. When talking about Junior Seau it is important to do so not only as a football player, but as a man. His contribution to the San Diego community has been more important and influential than any one of the 545 tackles Seau recorded over a twenty year NFL career.

The Junior Seau Foundation through its diverse programs has contributed four million dollars to helping young people with desire but without means to achieve their dreams since its inception in 1992. His foundation does this by handing out scholarships, funding athletic fields and giving under privileged children funds to buy presents for their loved ones around the holidays. His stamp on the city of Oceanside and the entire San Diego area will never be forgotten.

Neither will his prowess on the field. As a kid growing up on the East Coast the only players we heard about who played on the West Coast were the ones who played for consistently good teams and normally the most coverage was reserved for quarterbacks or other offensive stars. During his 13 year career with the San Diego Chargers the team had an overall record of 88-120. They made the Super Bowl in the 1994-1995 season but only reached the playoffs three times when Seau was a member of the team.

Despite playing for a team that was mediocre at best everyone knew who Seau was. Even on the East Coast we knew Seau was the best player at his position and remained so for the majority of his 20 year career. He should also be considered the greatest defensive player to ever wear a San Diego Charger jersey and will surely be a first ballot hall of famer. Seau went on to play with the Miami Dolphins for three years before retiring in August of 2006. Four days later he was coaxed out of retirement by the New England Patriots. In 2007 Seau was part of the 18-1 team that fell just short of perfection and providing Seau with the only thing missing from his illustrious career, a Super Bowl ring.

His distinguished career doesn’t need a ring to justify its greatness, although I am sure he would have loved to win one. Seau retired after playing one more year. In the years that followed his retirement Seau remained in the public spotlight through his charity work and as a restaurateur. Seau always seemed to be wearing a smile wherever he went, but perhaps there were some dark parts of his life that even a man as strong and determined as Seau couldn’t overcome.

What’s disturbing is the manner in which he went. Suicide is always tragic but to shoot oneself in the chest seems rare and raises questions about the motives behind the act. On February 17, 2011 Dave Duerson a former defensive back for the Chicago Bears also took his own life by shooting himself in the chest. Before doing so Duerson texted family members and requested his brain be researched by the Boston University School of Medicine. These doctors found that Duerson was suffering from a neurodegenerative disease that’s caused by repeated concussions.

Football is a violent game that involves high-speed collisions between very strong men. The NFL has built an empire on the sport and used its violence as a major marketing tool to increase their audience. However, it is becoming more and more evident that this violence has serious long-term negative effects on the player’s who sacrifice their bodies on a weekly basis to make the NFL one of the most powerful corporations in the world. Maybe Seau was starting to suffer serious side effects from all those years of leaving every part of himself on the football field for 20 plus years of his life.

Why Seau might have taken his own life is a topic that will be studied and discussed and analyzed for years to come, but that is not what today is for. Today and at least for the near future it is time to honor Junior Seau for the great man that he was. Even as an outsider it is obvious that when Junior Seau passed all of San Diego shed a tear for the loss of a beloved native son who will truly be missed.

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Te-Bowned

December 21, 2011

ESPN has recently announced that they will be starting a new channel called ESPN-BOW. It will be a channel that is totally dedicated to Tim Tebow. Viewers will get to follow him into the locker room for behind the scenes footage. They will get to watch him practice intently. Trips to the grocery store with Tim will be miked up. When Tim attends church a transcript of his personal prayers will run across the screen in a feature called the Godly Line. If Tim Tebow shits, which Sportscenter is still investigating if he actually does something that vile, ESPN-BOW viewers will be sitting on the toilet right next to Timmy! That’s right for all the Tebow fans who believe the 23 hours regular ESPN spends on Tim Tebow isn’t enough now you get twenty-four hours of Tebow time!

Seriously, is anyone else sick of Tebow-mania? The bottom line is Tebow isn’t that good, nor is he as bad as some people might have led you to believe in the past. The truth is he is a second-year quarterback who plays more like a fullback. Tebow’s 6-2 record as a starter can mostly be attributed to a strong defense that does not give up a lot of points and a ferocious running game that leads the league in rushing, averaging 156 yards a game. Tebow, is of course a big part of that rushing game. He is ranked 32nd in the league in rushing. He averages 5.5 yards a carry and 47 yards a game. Unfortunately Tebow only averages 117 yards passing per game. That’s the lowest average of any starter in the league. Part of Tebow’s lack of aerial numbers can be attributed to the Broncos change of offensive scheme once Tebow took over. John Fox and offensive coordinator Mike McCoy have done an amazing job playing towards Tebow’s strength which is running the ball. The Broncos after getting off to a 1-4 start are now in the driver’s seat in the AFC West. Tim Tebow is absolutely a big part of that. He is a leader who seems to win everywhere he goes and that’s contagious. He has infected the locker room as well as the entire fan base with a sense that they will win no matter who they play. When the game needs to be won in the fourth quarter he always seems to step up and his teammates believe in him supremely.  Eventually though, Tebow will have to develop as a more complete player. This past weekend against the Patriots it was obvious that when faced with high-class offensive opposition the Broncos conservative offensive approach couldn’t compete for four quarters. Tebow went 11 of 22 for 194 yards and led Denver with 93 yards on 12 carries scoring two touchdowns with his feet. That’s a great stat line and Denver’s 23 points would have been enough to beat most of the mediocre teams in the NFL. However, the NFL has changed. It is now a score first play defense later league where big-time quarterbacks seem to complete passes at will. The former golden boy before Tebow arrived, Tom Brady, went 23 of 34 for 320 yards and 2 scores. That is the new NFL and if Tebow wants to be a part of it someone is going to have to teach him to throw. Despite what ESPN would have you believe being white and loving God aren’t enough to make someone a successful NFL quarterback.

Don’t worry Tebow freaks because ESPN owns the world and your Tebow-fix is about to be even more satiated with the new ESPN-BOW. Now you can have Tim Tebow at your fingertips for 24 hours a day 7 days a week and 365 days a year. Hallelujah and all hail ESPN’s saintly son the mighty Tim Tebow.

Re-adressing Rex

October 9, 2011

I was hoping to order a piece of humble pie today. What I wanted more than anything was to stand up and yell “I was wrong!” as loud as I possibly could. Nothing would have made me happier in week 5 of the NFL season then to admit that I wouldn’t know a successful NFL Quarterback if one hit me in the face with a spiral. Rex Grossman ruined all that by being, well, Rex Grossman . To say I am underwhelmed by Rex’s performance is an understatement, but for all truthful purposes my dismay with Rex so far this year should have an asterisk beside it. I don’t like to admit that fact, but at 3-1 any Redskin fan who isn’t two clouds below nine should seek serious mental therapy immediately. This is a team picked by most to be one of the worst in the league and here they are sitting atop the NFC East with a game in hand over the hated New York Giants. I will be the first to admit the East is weak, but first place is still first place. The question is are the Redskins winning with Rex or despite him? Any Redskin fan worth his weight in Burgundy and Gold will tell you it is the latter. Rex started strong but is slowly turning into the careless, inadequate, slow-footed and dim-witted turnover machine we have all grown to hate. This is not to say that I am a John Beck guy. I could be with enough whiskey in me, but my sober and realistic allegiance falls with Tim Hightower, Ryan Torain, Roy Helu and the entire Redskins defense. Those are the guys that have made the Redskins 3-1 and they are the ones who will keep Washington competitive throughout the rest of the NFL season. This division is weak. The so-called dream team in Philadelphia are two losses away from being no more than ESPN’s off-season hype champions. Tony Romo’s repeated meltdowns are indeed “hilarious” as stated by My Favorite Redskin Chris Cooley, and if they continue the Cowboys will be no more than comic relief for the rest of the season. The New York  Giants look strong up the middle both on offense and defense, but is anyone really afraid of Eli Manning? This may sound crazy but the Redskins winning the NFC East is not out of the realm of possibility. So do me a favor Shanahan’s, make Joe Gibbs and my father happy, run the ball. As long as we do that and our defense continues to dominate the line of scrimmage we will be in this race until the very end. To Rex all I can say is channel your inner Trent Dilfer and stay out of the rest of teams way.


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